Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for September 15th, 2008

The question came up recently (no, not in regards to me): How does one use social networking tools to find the next great job? Well, there is no simple answer. Truth be told, just being on LinkedIn, Facebook, Myspace and having a blog won’t land you that Creative Director or Marketing VP job. You’re going to have to work at it a little harder than that. BUT, leveraging social networking tools to your advantage can give you a bit of an extra boost in some circles – over time. ZDnet’s Jennifer Leggio points us to a quick primer this week on that very topic. As guest contributor Mike Murray explains:

Social networking sites provide an incredible opportunity to make radical changes in your career. But those changes aren’t necessarily going to be good ones unless you do it right. Ultimately, social networking tools are much like a race car — they help a good driver become a great one, and they help a bad driver become a pile of twisted, smoking metal up against a concrete wall.

The main thing that a social networking site can help you with is the concept of your “personal brand” — that is, the sites can be used as tools to allow you to become known within a target audience of people. Used well, you can turn yourself in to an expert among experts. Used poorly, you can easily turn yourself into that guy with the 55 pictures of himself drunk and passed out on the floor of your college fraternity house. Caveat emptor.

Fortunately, Mike has some experience with this (the topic… not the frat house incident thing), and he has these nuggets of genius to share:

1. Niche-ify

As I mentioned earlier, social networking tools give you the opportunity to brand yourself — to become known. This means that you have to decide what you’re going to be known FOR.

And, lest you think that you can just drift along, it’s like the sage old Rush song lyric says: “If you choose not to decide, you still have made a choice.”

The first rule in marketing (and, truly, this is a form of marketing yourself) is to choose your niche. Choose what your product (in this case, you) will be known for. Are you going to be the girl who is always there when people need help? The social networking expert? The nuclear physicist who dabbles in playing the piano? […] Pick a niche that you can become known for, and anybody who is looking for someone to do a job in that niche will naturally find you.

2. Cool Friends = Cool You

That maxim comes from Tom Peters and it rings more true to me with each person whose career I observe — we get our best career opportunities through the people that we know. If those people are amazingly cool and are doing cool work, cool opportunities come to us. If those people aren’t so cool, or are spending all day sitting around the house… well, you know where you’re going to end up.

Studies repeatedly bear this out. Studies show that our income is likely to be within 10 percent of our five closest friends. That our weight is likely to be near that of the people closest to us.

This is where social networking gives an incredible opportunity. Through tools like Twitter and LinkedIn, you can follow, talk with, and ultimately get to know people who you deem as cool. Interested in getting to know social networking experts (like Jennifer)? Follow them on Twitter. Say something interesting in response to one of her comments. And make a new friend.

This is an opportunity that those 15 years ago simply didn’t have. Sure, you could sit down and write a letter to someone you admired… but it wasn’t quite as easy as sending them a message on Facebook.

3. Stay On Message

This is an area where politicians are far better than the average person — it’s one of the things that allows them to get their messages across so effectively and make their messages part of the common cultural lexicon. (For example, even now if someone says “flip-flop” to me, John Kerry comes to mind). If you’re a fan of the “Daily Show”, you’ve seen the compilations where all of the different politicians use the same words and phrases on every TV show and speaking appearance over the course of a few weeks.

Once you have your niche and network of cool friends, staying on message to reiterate your expertise within your niche is important. Unfortunately, this is where most people don’t use their social networking tools effectively to enhance their careers. Even if you get the first two pieces right, it’s easy to start treating Facebook and Twitter like a personal journal.

I’d start giving my own thoughts here, but the best thinking I’ve seen on this matter comes from Tim Ferriss (author of “The Four-Hour Workweek”):

“Use Twitter as a “micro-blogging” platform, exactly how it’s most often described. Just as I wouldn’t put up a blog post that reads “just ate a burrito. Mmmm… good,” as it consumes readers valuable attention without adding value, I wouldn’t put up such a post on Twitter.”

The point here is that these are tools for enhancing your career: use them that way. Keep your messages tailored to your audience, and make sure that they’re helping you be known for what you want to be known for.

Wise, wise advice. (Note to self: No more burrito-themed micro-blogging posts. Got it.) ;D

Read the entire piece here.

Also check out this post on The Social Media Marketing blog. It takes the concept of personal branding several steps further, with helpful references to Haji Flemings‘ “Brand YU” method of building a personal brand, namely:

  1. Identify your passion
  2. Define your mission
  3. Count the cost
  4. Create your voice
  5. Develop your core
  6. Be authentic
  7. Shift to now

Check out Haji’s website for more info about his method, his book, or his upcoming brand camp.

Read Full Post »

“Over 50% of consumers want greener, more natural housing cleaners, but only 5% actually purchase this category of product.”

– Jennifer Van der Meer –Former Wall Street Analyst, green activist and innovation strategist.

Fantastic piece on Core77 by Jennifer Van der Meer on the convergence of design, (customer) movements, product adoption and innovation against the backdrop of “green” product growth.

Here are some tidbits:

Recently, I was invited to participate as a Speaker at the Greener by Design conference in Alexandria, VA, with innovation culture and systems guru, Robert Shelton. Our talk focused on the encouraging shift towards more open models of innovation, where knowledge is shared both inside and outside a company’s walls to solve for the complex and daunting challenges that we face. This praise for the widening of knowledge networks emerged as a theme in many different conversations throughout the rest of the conference. More and more companies have begun to shift sustainability from public relations statements and corporate social responsibility promises to actual product development and marketing activity–a way to create real value. Facing up to climate change will require a major redesign in the way we bring things to market.

The caveat? Over 50% of consumers want greener, more natural housing cleaners, but only 5% actually purchase this category of product: consumers do not want tradeoffs. Clorox’s Green Works is one company that embraced this gap. How did the Green Works team aim to get past the 5%? When choosing household cleaners, green-leaning consumers are looking for proven efficacy, broad availability, comparable price, and a brand they know and trust. They’re not willing to settle for a product that performs less than a more eco-unfriendly alternative. Clorox Green Works accepted these constraints and delivered a natural product that passed blind performance tests–in partnership with the Sierra Club. Despite initial external skepticism that a brand like Clorox could succeed with a natural product offering, the good word got out and sales results have “far exceeded expectations,” according to Kohler.

The “no tradeoffs, no compromise” approach has served as a mantra in many companies and across industries when challenged with comprehensive green innovation. But there’s something missing in this stark consumer win-it-all equation: Consumers are not part of the conversation and they know it.

I have spent a good deal of time sitting down with these emerging green consumers and many themes come into to focus. When asked to take the time to give their real opinion about their lifestyle, they reveal an untapped desire to participate in the process to be more than just a stat about consumption and purchase behavior. When you move the conversation beyond price and performance benefits to engage people in the challenge of designing a green future, they want to do so much more than just vote with their wallet.

Unleashing the Innovator in Everyone
In fact, I found that once on the topic I could not get these consumers to stop thinking about innovation and the role they should play in the design process. One-on-one interviews, blog studies, and focus groups all inevitably turn into green therapy sessions. People wanted to dissect how they chose to eat their food, build their home, rely on transportation, raise their children, and create meaning in their lives. When the conversation shifted to how we could live more sustainably, the real ideas would begin to flow.

While it was personally gratifying to be a part of these discussions, I found that my role as a strategist and researcher had major limitations. It was costly to send someone like me around the world, burning jet fuel, to have deep conversations only to fold these insights into traditional briefs on brand and product development. At the same time, every industry started getting green religion and claiming a green message. But the old compartmentalize structure was still in place, which resulted in confusion all along the chain, the initial pleasure and fascination with the complexity of the problem devolved into fatigue amongst the newly green converts at the consumer and corporate level.

The roles of designers, product development specialists, and marketers should never have been as segmented and will never be again. Participation is the key to innovation…

I realized that the nature of this challenge requires constant, ongoing conversation between all the elements. Even a successful human-centered approach to the fuzzy front end completely drops off when we hit the conveyor belt process for product development. Ideas once sensibly vetted are suddenly forced to move lock step through the phases required for launch, and often get watered down in the process. This is in fact where the activity of greenwashing occurs–good intentions turn into skepticism, compromises, and incidental innovation. How do we create a system that provides more interaction, iteration and a feedback loop?

Read the rest of Jennifer’s piece here. It’s well worth the detour.

Have a great Monday everyone. 😉

Read Full Post »